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GI23726

George V 1911 long gold proof Set for Coronation NGC graded PF62-66

Regular price £27,500
Regular price Sale price £27,500

George V (1910-36),Proof four gold and eight silver coin long Set, 1911, Coronation year, gold Five Pounds, Two Pounds, Sovereign and Half-Sovereign, silver Halfcrown, Florin, Shilling, Sixpence and Maundy Set, all housed in original Royal Mint case with gold block crest and lettering (S.PS11).All with some very light handling marks, all slabbed and graded by NGC as per footnote below, becoming a rare set.

NGC Certifications:

Five Pounds as PF62, NGC certification 6670839-001.

Two Pounds as PF64, NGC certification 6670840-002.

Sovereign as PF66 Cameo, NGC certification 6670840-004.

Half-Sovereign as PF66 Cameo, NGC certification 6670840-005.

Halfcrown as PF66, NGC certification 6670842-002.

Florin as PF63, NGC certification 6670842-004.

Shilling as PF66, NGC certification 6670842-006.

Sixpence as PF65, NGC certification 6670842-008.

Maundy Groat as PF66, NGC certification 6670842-010.

Maundy Threepence as PF65, NGC certification 6670842-012.

Maundy Twopence as PF64, NGC certification 6670842-014.

Maundy Penny as PF66, NGC certification 6670842-016.

These "long gold" proof sets were produced to celebrate the Coronation of King George V on 22ndJune 1911, with a mintage of only 2,812 sets.The Proof sets of 1911 were issued with gold coins in either long or short format, the long set comprised of twelve coins; a Gold Five Pounds down to the Maundy Penny with a mintage of 2812 sets; the short set starting and the Sovereign and down, making it a ten-coin set. There was also a "budget" third set with the proof silver coins only from Halfcrown to Maundy Penny. Usually the original Royal Mint red case with gold block crest and lettering, cream silk inlay and blue velvet cushioning accompanies these sets, as we will see below in the pricing scheme for the Royal mint.

The new coronation Proof (referred to as specimen at the time) coinage and medals were offered out to the public with the following price tags according to the Royal Mint annual Report 1911 vol no.42: 'the [official] coronation medals were obtainable at the Bank of England and its London and country branches' insofar as the Proof sets the following information was noted in the annual report: 'Specimen coins of the new designs struck from polished dies were issued to the public during the year in sets at the following charges; Set A (the Long gold set), ten pounds without case, an additional 6s for the case of issue. Set B (the short gold set) a cost of two pounds and 10 shillings, an additional five shillings for the case. Set C (purely the silver coins omitting all gold) all offered with case for 15 shillings. The Coronation Medal and specimen coin account of 1911 showed a working profit of £6364, 18 shillings and 11pence, for the aforementioned coins and medals. The Coronation of the King took place on the 22nd June 1911, we note the new proof coins were first exhibited at the British Numismatic Society meeting of 25th October 1911 by Mr Cumberland Clark.

Relating to the actual coins in these sets, the obverse was designed by Betram Mackennal - the portraiture shows not only a likeness to the King but a distinct depth and almost medallic relief, as would be expected with a specialised proof die, mirrored fields, heightened rims and any of the other classic Proof leitmotifs. Proof coins at this stage were highly developed and truly FDC specimens would be a remarkable sight even to the seasoned numismatist or dealer. These 1911 sets were essentially the last of the classic style Proof sets before Elizabeth II assumed the throne, as the 1937 sets of George VI were strictly speaking Pattern sets as opposed to Proof striking's. There is a distinction. For all intents and purposes, 1911: the last of the old classic sets, in full silver content that can find their style-lineage in the 1826 set of George IV. A true balance and synergy of old traditional standards with the technology and methods of a new century. The one criticism that did arrive was the lack of a five shilling crown and there was no such coin for this reign until 1927 with the advent of the wreath style crowns.

The reverses have the following formula in place; the tried and tested if not lauded Pistrucci reverses for the four gold coins, the silver reverse dies being the work mainly of George William De Saulles. The halfcrown superb, a crowned quartered shield of arms with the national emblems positioned and the French motto inscription in the inner legend, the other denominations all conforming to standard patterns and designs from the late Hanoverian period. Leonard Charles Wyon originally designed the Florin reverse, the Maundy money reverses were originally designed by Jean Baptiste Merlen. A great medley of highly esteemed engravers and designers coming together.

The Spink monthly numismatic circular of January 1911 reproduced the proclamation by the King from the London gazette - the proclamation was read on the steps of the Royal exchange November 29th 1910 by Lt Colonel Kearns, the common crier and the serjeant at arms. The actual information in the proclamation was all standardised information on effigy uniformity and legend inscriptions, ensuring standards were being followed for the coin of the realm.

The 1911 Proof series, whether in full set format or as individual denomination is gradually becoming a rare area of British numismatics in the UK at least. Finding complete sets with uniform grade and tone that hasn't been split up at a point in time is without doubt an arduous task.

Sir Bertram Mackennal (1863-1931), An Australian sculptor and medallist, making coins, medals and sculptures of George V, signing his work B. M.

George William de Saulles (1862-1903), engraved and designed the South Africa medal, the national lifeboat and the Transport service medals. He was also responsible for the British trade dollar and other colonial coins, impressively he made the last great seal for Queen Victoria in 1899.

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