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HM29330

EIC, Madras Presidency, silver Rupee, Chinapatan, AH[11]26, year 3.

British India, East India Company, Madras Presidency, Mughal-style silver Rupee, in the name of Farrukh-Siyar (AH 1124-31/1713-19), Chinapatan, AH [11]26, yr 3 [1714/15], sikka zad az fazl hagg bar sim wa zar badshah bahar wa bar farrukh-siyar [Struck money of gold and silver by the grace of God Emperor of sea and land Farrukh-Siyar], rev. zarb chinapatan sanat 3 julus maimanat manus [Struck at Chinapatan in the 3rd year of tranquil prosperity], 11.54g, 9h (Prid. 127 [not in Sale]; Stevens 2.23; KM. E302). Shroff mark on edge, otherwise good very fine, lovely clear mint and name, rare. NGC AU Details: Shroff Marked Edge.

NGC Certification 6322252-020

Provenance:

Ex Puddester Collection, Part One, Noonans, 8-9 February 2023, Lot 65

Facing competition, sabotage and attempted assassination from other European companies, the agents of the East India Company sought various locations for strongholds, trading-centres and factories. In 1640 Fort St George was established on what was then uninhabited land, and an EIC mint was striking local-style coinage, Pagodas and Cash, by 1643. When the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb conquered the state of Golconda in 1687 Mughal-style coinage began to be used in the south of India. To facilitate trade, the East India Company negotiated permission from the emperor to strike Mughal-style coins in the area, in 1692. Initially the mint name on these coins was Chinapatan, the local name for Madras which is now the metropolis Chennai.

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