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BM01005

Edward the Confessor Helmet Type Penny, Hastings

Edward the Confessor (1042-66), silver Penny, pointed helmet type (1053-56), Hastings Mint, Moneyer Brid, King in profile right draped wearing helmet, holding lis headed sceptre, bust to edge of coin, legend in Latin commences upper right, +EDPE RD REI, rev. annulet at centre of cross with tri-crescent ends, linear circles and Latin legend surrounding, +BRID ON HÆSTING: weight 1.13g (N.825; S.1179). Well struck portrait, toned almost extremely fine and very desirable with a full mint name reading, rare.

An historically interesting piece being struck at the Hastings Mint and with such a full reading of the Mint name, as Edward the Confessor features prominently at the start of the Bayeaux Tapestry in the prelude to the Battle of Hastings. The transition from late Anglo-Saxon to Norman Kings can be traced by collecting the Mint of Hastings for Edward the Confessor, Harold II and William the Conqueror as a Battle of Hastings themed group. The Latin legends translate as "King Edward" on obverse, and "Brid of Hastings" on the reverse.

One of the Cinque Ports of England, Hastings was overrun by the Danes in 1011, and struck coins from the reign of Aethelred II (978-1016) until the end of the Norman period under King Stephen (1135-54).

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