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EM13493

Charles I Crown, Briot's first milled issue XF45

Charles I (1625-1649), silver Crown of Five Shillings, Nicholas Briot's first milled coinage, (1631-32), armoured King on horseback left holding upright sword, with flowing sash behind, pebble groundline below, inner beaded circle surrounding only broken by sword blade, initial mark daisy with tiny B to left, lozenge stops in Latin legend and outer toothed border surrounding, CAROLVS. D: G. MAGN. BRITAN. FRAN. ET. HIBER. REX., rev. inverted die axis, quartered shield of arms in crowned frame, crowned C over lozenge to left, crowned R over lozenge to right, inner beaded circle surrounding, lozenge stops in Latin legend and outer toothed border surrounding, terminal mark tiny .B. to left of crown, .CHRISTO. AVSPICE. REGNO., weight 30.10g (Brooker 714; N.2298; S.2852). Toned, flan imperfections in striking of reverse rim in two places, some other light tiny striations on obverse and some light flan adjustment marks on reverse near rim, otherwise the detail of the horseman most attractive, has been graded and slabbed by NGC as XF45 and currently the third highest graded at this service, rare.

30.01 grams of 0.925 silver. Made in the UK.

HS Code 9705 3100 00

NGC Certification 5880675-001.

The abbreviated Latin legends translate as on the obverse "Charles by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland"; and on the reverse "I reign under the auspice of Christ."

Nicholas Briot the Engraver general to the mints of France, introduced his mechanised mill press to the Tower Mint in 1631, and produced at the 22 carat standard two small issues of gold coins in 1631 and 1638, concurrent with the regular hammered issues. The milled issues were engraved to a very fine quality by Briot, like the coin offered here. Briot had gained the King's favour in 1626 after having moved to England in 1625, the King wanting to improve the artistic merit of the nation's coinage, which led to Briot's official appointment as mint engraver in 1634.

Provenance:

Ex St James Auction 13, 6th May 2010, lot 572.

Ex St James Auction 16, 7th December 2010, lot 70.

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