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BM02171

Anglo-Saxon Pale Gold Thrymsa, Post-Crondall

Early Anglo Saxon (c.600-75), Post-Crondall Type (c.655-675), pale gold Thrymsa or Tremissis, Two Emperor's type, helmeted bust right, runes around and outer beaded border, rev. inverted die axis, stylized winged figure of Victory with Emperor's head under each wing, weight 1.16g (Metcalf 80; N.20; S.767). Rim chip and a few light areas of friction on highest points and residual dirt in the devices, otherwise good very fine and scarce.

Inspired by Roman coin issues of the Fourth Century, these early Anglo-Saxon coin productions have a very low percentage of gold in their make-up perhaps 6-20%, perhaps due to a gold shortage throughout Europe at that time, which ultimately led to the issue of the silver Penny. The design with Victory was probably struck in Kent around 650-660 as a Thrymsa derived from the word Tremissis and were in fact the gold "shillings" referred to in Anglo-Saxon documents. It is thought such large denomination pieces would have been used for payment of compositions or fines rather than in normal currency use.

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