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GM24289

William II Penny, Cross voided type, Southwark Mint, Moneyer Wulfgar

Regular price £6,000
Regular price Sale price £6,000

William II (1087-1100), silver Penny, two stars / voided cross type (1092-95?), Southwark Mint, moneyer Wulfgar, facing crowned bust to edge of coin, large star either side, legend commencing lower left with inner linear and outer beaded circles surrounding both sides, +PILLELM RI, rev. annulet at centre of voided cross pattée, over a cross annulettée in saltire, +PIILGIIR ON SIIÐ, weight 1.40g (BMC type III 222; N.853; S.1260). Toned, a little weak in parts though with a decent portrait of the King, a bold very fine for issue, rare.

The legends translate as "William King " on obverse and on the reverse "Wulfgar of Southwark."

North records up to 11 moneyers working at Southwark for William I and I and producing all types for William II.

William Rufus was the third son of William I, with the name Rufus perhaps a reference to him being a red-haired child or less likely due to ruddy appearance. He never married or had any children, and was a wise ruler and a victorious leader, but at the same time some said uncultivated in taste, without dignity or social graces and without showing religious piety or morales, and some said even addicted to vices. He did however maintain justice and good order for England, the throne of which he received on the death of his Father, with his eldest brother Robert Curthose inheriting Normandy with whom William had a peaceful relationship. William Rufus extended rule into Anglo-Norman Wales and had Scotland under his lordship whilst he recovered Maine while pressuring Vexin in France. William famously suffered his death whilst hunting in the New Forest on 2nd August 1100, a stray arrow taking his life, perhaps accidental with unproven suspicions of murder, his nobleman having deserted him in the heat of the moment. Ironically his elder brother Richard, the second son of William the Conqueror had also died in a New Forest hunting accident circa 1075, which paved the way for William Rufus to accede the English throne. As he died childless the throne then passed to his younger brother Henry known as Henry Beauclerc.

Southwark Mint on the south bank of the Thames separate from the City of London is mentioned in the Burghal Hidage and is part of old Surrey. The town was burnt by William the Conqueror in 1066 with minting activity from the reign of Aethelred II until Stephen with a burst of later minting activity occurring in the Tudor period.

Provenance:
Ex Heritage, New York Signature Sale, 3rd January 2010, lot 21556.

Ex Collection of an English Doctor part II, Sovereign Rarities fixed price list online May 2022.

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