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GM25801

Eadmund Penny, crowned portrait, moneyer Clac, long Moneta type signature

Regular price £11,500
Regular price Sale price £11,500

Eadmund (939-946),silver Penny, portrait type, Moneyer Clac (Klakkr), crowned and draped bust right extending to bottom of coin, legend with linear inner circle surrounding, toothed border around rim, legend commences at left, +EADMVND RE,rev.small cross pattée, legend with linear inner circle surrounding, +CLAC MONE IIONE IITX, weight 1.48g (BMC VI, 2; CTCE 263; SCBI 34:481-2 British Museum; N.698; S.1107).Toned with an attractive portrait, flan a little undulating, some raised hairline die flaws on reverse, good very fine and very rare.

Though there are many moneyers operating in the reign of Eadmund across a number of different coinages in this seven year reign, according to North there is only one proven mint in operation at Norwich for the portrait coinage and this coin appears to be of that sort of style. Clac with this long enigmatic reading on the reverse was once thought to decipher as the City of London as a mint signature but this was disputed by Brooke in a 1925 Numismatic Chronicle article and it may just be a random extension of the Moneta signature.

The only other suggested mint named pieces with a portrait are from three different moneyers whose Pennies give a B mint signature, which might be Bedford. There are some non-portrait coins issued with Chester, Wallingford and perhaps Derby mint signatures.

The obverse Latin legend translates as "Eadmund King" and the reverse as "Clac moneyer."

Eadmund was the eldest son of King Edward the Elder's third marriage with Edgiva born circa 920. It seems the dynastic succession problems for the unmarried Aethelstan had left Eadmund named as heir in 939 when Eadmund was 18. At this time the Scandanavians of York, having been annexed since 927, invited the King of Dublin Olaf Gufrithsson to take over the city and invade the "Five Boroughs" from which a struggle of power ensued. It was not until 942 that Edmund recovered the boroughs, Olaf having died the year before, but his cousin Olaf Sihtricsson remained in control at York, shortly replaced by Ragnall, who reached terms with Eadmund. However, in 944 Eadmund took York back killing Ragnall, and the full Kingdom was restored as per the days of Aethelstan and he embarked on extension as far as the Solway Firth. Eadmund was known as "The Magnificent" for his display of Kingship from this time, however he was killed in a brawl on the 28thMay 946, after recognizing a known thief illegally attending a celebration in Pucklechurch near Bath. Eadmund was still under 25 years old and his two sons Eadwig and Eadgar were mere children, so his younger brother Eadred succeeded him to the throne.

Provenance:

Ex Silbury Coins with ticket and pencil annotation that was purchased 1st October 2013 for £8,500.

Ex G. F. Trow Collection, Triton XXIII, Classical Numismatic Group, 14th January 2020, lot 1285.

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